Traveling to Mexico this summer? Condé Nast Traveler recommends Merida

According to Condé Nast Traveler it’s worth hopping on a plane down to Mérida this summer for its sherbet-hued architecture alone. The weather is (finally) warming up and we’re turning our attentions to summer vacation. Here’s where to go. Planning summer travel is exciting—but it can also be daunting. Do you stay domestic or opt for an adventure further afield? Bite the bullet and book a...

4 of the best helicopter sightseeing tours in North America

It’s magical. And it’s very loud. That moment when a helicopter lifts off is a sweet sensory overload, with turbine engines screaming and the main rotor beating the air into submission just a few feet above your head. But coddled in a good set of noise-canceling headphones or cocooned in a super-soundproofed cabin, you can experience the wonder of rotary-winged flight while marveling at...

Mississippi River: North America’s Mighty River

The Mississippi River is the second longest river in North America (after the Missouri River) and the fourth longest river in the world (after the Nile, Amazon and Yangtze rivers). The river’s basin is the largest drainage system in North America, reaching parts of 31 states and two Canadian provinces. The Missouri and Ohio rivers merge with the Mississippi River just north of St. Louis, Missouri,...

New Calculations Reposition the Geographical Center of North America

After an 90-year-reign, the title moves from Rugby, North Dakota, to the city of Center, in Oliver County In 1928, a U.S. Geological Survey mathematician determined the geographic center of North America by balancing a cardboard cutout of the continent with a pin stuck through it on his finger, reports April Baumgarten at Forum New Service. His result, reports Baumgarten, was an area roughly six miles...

Best Skiing and Snowboarding In North America: Liftopia’s Best In Snow Winners Announced

Liftopia, the snowsports industry’s leading online lift ticket discounter, just compiled its first ever now to be annual Best in Snow Awards, honoring North America’s most beloved ski areas. The results were released today. Unlike other “Best” lists, the 2016-17 Best in Snow Awards incorporate what Liftopia claims is the largest dataset in the industry, having tracked the buying patterns of...

Finding North America’s lost medieval city – Part 3

Heterarchy When you’re excavating at Cahokia, you start to appreciate what it was like to build the mounds here a millennium ago. We shoveled clay into buckets, sweated, hydrated, and repeated. Our hands were covered in garbage and dirt. We watched the sun’s path overhead to mark the time, always wary of looming storm clouds. Of course, we hadn’t gone completely medieval. Baltus supplemented...

Finding North America’s lost medieval city – Part 2

The Mississippians Mound cities are an ancient tradition in North America, going back millennia before Cahokia. The continent’s first known earthwork is at Poverty Point in Louisiana, built 3,400 years ago, when many of the Egyptian pyramids were still under construction. Today you can still see its remains in crescent-shaped ridge mounds that look like huge nested parentheses on a bluff overlooking...

Finding North America’s lost medieval city – Part 1

Cahokia was North America’s biggest city—then it was completely abandoned. I went there to find out why. A thousand years ago, huge pyramids and earthen mounds stood where East St. Louis sprawls today in Southern Illinois. This majestic urban architecture towered over the swampy Mississippi River floodplains, blotting out the region’s tiny villages. Beginning in the late 900s, word about...

Mexican delight: Beach town fun, colonial charm in Mazatlán

Mexico has many beach destinations with world-class resorts and palm-lined stretches of white sand. But there’s only one destination that can truly be called the country’s “Colonial City on the Beach.” That’s the city of Mazatlán, on Mexico’s Pacific Coast. Mazatlán was settled by Spanish conquistadors in the 16th century. Today, the cobblestone streets of Old Mazatlán are lined with...

Food-tour company plans tuktuk-vehicle sightseeing, sampling tours of Lancaster

Crowdfunding campaign for vehicle purchase ends Wednesday Next year, Timm Wenger hopes, visitors to Lancaster will have a whole new way to see the city — in an unusual vehicle that’s a common form of transportation in other parts of the world. Wenger, who runs the Taste the World food-sampling walking tours in Lancaster with his wife, Kristina, is working toward buying a tuktuk, a three-wheeled,...